Book Review – The Life Engineered

life engineered Overall review:3 Stars (3 / 5)

The Life Engineered, by J.F. Dubeau is a story revolving around the trials and tribulations of a group of sentient robots, called Capeks.  The Capeks live in space, and their prime mission is to rebuild a destroyed Milky Way Galaxy.  Capeks have been created by humans just for this purpose.  But, when creatures are sentient, of course they develop their own ideas about things!

This book is a winner of the Sword and Laser Collection contest run on the Inkshares publishing site early last year.

I so wanted to like this book. I mean, sentient robots who get to live in space in a utopian society, not bound by nuisances like absolute zero, lack of gravity, no atmosphere, solar radiation etc.  What’s not to like? I read the first page, completely ready to be pleased.

But, about halfway through, I just had to put it aside.

I spent quite a bit of time in analysis on what it was I didn’t like about it, and my final conclusion it was just for too much to cover in one book.

There are basically three completely different settings, two of which need some real worldbuilding finesse to make them believable.  There are dozens of characters, and none of them are given the depth that is required to make them interesting and make the reader CARE about them.

The story line itself was muddled and the first three chapters were so diverse in settings and poorly transitioned, I had trouble piecing the threads of connection together, even half way through the book.  As I said before, the characterization was superficial, there were some nuances brought out in the protagonist at various points, which I thought were worthy of more expansion.  And there was a real bright and charming moment with one of the robot constructs that I enjoyed thoroughly.

And, as I said before the worldbuilding left a lot to be desired, in all three settings.  As far as craft, I think the talent is there, certainly the imagination is.  But, more work needs to be done to improve these skills.

Copy and line editing was excellent, I didn’t find any errors to stumble over.

The cover art was well done, rendered well on a computer and reflected the plot of the book very nicely.

And just as a side note, I think that this entire concept would have worked VERY well in a Weir/Howey model – i.e. short stories serialized over a period of time to give the author time to build a readership, develop a complex “storyverse,” and create real depth in the characters.  And those types of exercises always give an author the chance for improvements in crafting.

Story Line:2 Stars (2 / 5)
Characterization:2 Stars (2 / 5)
Readability:5 Stars (5 / 5)
Writing Craft:3 Stars (3 / 5)
Cover Art:5 Stars (5 / 5)
Worldbuilding:2 Stars (2 / 5)